Current Exhibitions

Fractured: North Dakota’s Oil Boom

August 3 - October 12, 2014
 

Journey to the prairies of western North Dakota with nationally acclaimed photographer Terry Evans and award-winning journalist and filmmaker Elizabeth Farnsworth to explore the impact of the current oil boom on the Williston Basin region. Most of the oil is obtained by fracking—injecting fluids into the ground to fracture shale oil—and this controversial practice brings welcome prosperity to some, but tragedy to others. Through vivid photography and personal testimony, learn how this drilling process is irrevocably altering prairie habitats and could bring catastrophic global warming even closer; and also hear from the families and communities that benefit from this economic boon, which may help make the United States energy independent. Follow these modern day explorers as they document the loss of a storied landscape to industry, and decide for yourself what the ultimate outcome should be.
 

This exhibition was developed by The Field Museum, Chicago, in collaboration with Terry Evans and Elizabeth Farnsworth, Fellows of the Center for Art+Environment at the Nevada Museum of Art. The North Dakota Museum of Art is touring “Fractured” throughout North Dakota in 2015.
 

Grand Forks Herald Press

 



Terry Evans, Oil pad on Davis prairie near White Earth, June 2011, chromogenic photograph, 44 x 44 in.

 

B E A D
Glen Hanson

August 3 - October 12, 2014
 

In 1973, the first major Pop Art Auction took place in New York at Parker Bernet, the Robert and Ethel Scull collection. As Assistant Director of Dayton’s Gallery 12, I was there with John Stoller, the Gallery Director, and we purchased two works; a Rauschenberg painting and a John Chamberlin sculpture.

Flash ahead forty years, I’m living in a Toyota camper and attaching glass beads to brain-tanned deer hide. Life can be strange. The technique I use, called “Lazy Stitch” by the Lakota, consists of beads layed down in rows of seven and is a very limited geometric form language. There is only one diagonal that forms a solid line. Other than that, you have a 90 degree angle and that’s about it. Though it is a limited language, that is what interests me about this medium. It is basic, like the twelve bar form in music which, though likewise limited, gave birth to blues, country and rock and roll. It is seemingly inexhaustible whether used by Muddy Waters, Hank Williams, Ornette Coleman or Philip Glass. The challenge is what you can do with so little.

When I think of where my work will go, I do not think in terms of decisions I will be making, rather I think in terms of improving the decision-making process.

 


Glen Hanson, For George M (Morrison Horizon), 1997, Glass beads on brain-tanned deer hide, 6 x 11 in. Collection of Kate and Stuart Nielsen.

 

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Lotus IV (The Lotus Series), 2008, Pigmented inkjet with photogravure, 45 ¾ x 60 ¾ x 1 ¾ in., Edition 2/2 EP Collection of Universal Limited Art Editions, Inc.

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Lotus IV (The Lotus Series) Detail, 2008, Pigmented inkjet with photogravure, 45 ¾ x 60 ¾ x 1 ¾ in., Edition 2/2 EP Collection of Universal Limited Art Editions, Inc.

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Lotus IV (The Lotus Series) Detail, 2008, Pigmented inkjet with photogravure, 45 ¾ x 60 ¾ x 1 ¾ in., Edition 2/2 EP Collection of Universal Limited Art Editions, Inc.

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Lotus IV (The Lotus Series) Detail, 2008, Pigmented inkjet with photogravure, 45 ¾ x 60 ¾ x 1 ¾ in., Edition 2/2 EP Collection of Universal Limited Art Editions, Inc.

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg

Lotus IV (The Lotus Series) Detail, 2008, Pigmented inkjet with photogravure, 45 ¾ x 60 ¾ x 1 ¾ in., Edition 2/2 EP Collection of Universal Limited Art Editions, Inc.

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG: FOUR DECADES OF WORK ON PAPER

August 3 - October 12, 2014
Exhibition Opening
 

Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE) is a fine art print publisher established in 1957 by Tatyana Grosman. Initially making lithographs with artists such as Larry Rivers, Sam Francis, Jasper Johns, and Robert Rauschenberg, ULAE sparked a revival of printmaking in America. From 1962-64, Zigmunds Priede was a Master Printmaker at ULAE before decamping in 1964 for the University of Minnesota where he stayed for fourteen years. He began supplying ULAE with student printers and among them was Bill Goldston, originally brought to ULAE in 1969 to work on photo-sensitive stones for Rauschenberg. He was to stay on for a lifetime, ultimately head of the not-for-profit publishing house ULAE became. Robert Rauschenberg came and went for years, a life-giving core at the heart of ULAE. His 1974 lithograph, Tanya, pays homage to the woman who started a whole art movement after having spent almost half of her life fleeing war and revolution that pursued her to Japan, Dresden, Paris, and finally New York. When she and her husband Maurice chanced upon two Bavarian lithographic stones in their front yard in Illip, New York, lithography became an important artistic took in the last decades of the twentieth century.  


This exhibition in North Dakota resulted from the Museum’s friendship with Bll Goldston who created a Walter Piehl benefit print for the Museum in 2013.
 


 

Barton's Place

November 16, 2013 - Ongoing
 

Barton Lidice Benes lived in a magical apartment in New York City. It was filled with over $1 million in African, Egyptian, South American, Chinese and contemporary art, plus much more as touted in the New York Times when it announced Barton’s intended gift to North Dakota (2/6/05).

Barton Benes and his treasure trove spent decades tucked away in a glorious boxcar space in Westbeth, the artist community in New York’s West Village. There, rare works of art joined ranks with the arcane, the wistful, the amusing, the deeply serious, and a “maddening and morbid array of things” (a human toe found on New York’s Williamsburg Bridge, a stuffed mink wearing a mink coat, an eight-foot giraffe head). This temporary installation suggests the drama and mystery embedded in Barton’s private wonderland. Continue reading...

 

N.D. MUSEUM OF ART RECONSTRUCTS NEW YORK ARTIST’S APARTMENT
 
Radiolab Podcast: As It Happens

 


 

 

Walter Piehl / ULAE print benefits NDMOA

 

North Dakota artist Walter Piehl collaborated with Bill Goldston, Director of Universal Limited Art Editions on Long Island, to create a work of art as a benefit for the North Dakota Museum of Art. ULAE is known as a pioneer for its work with artists such as Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and James Rosenquist as they introduced lithography as a fine art form to Americans. Only thirty Walter Piehl prints exist. Print number one will go into the Museum's permanent collection. Print two will be raffled off to the general public, and the remaining twenty-eight are available for Museum supporters, Walter's friends, and collectors. Contact the Museum 701.777.4195 to secure your print, destined to take its rightful place in the history of art on the Northern Plains.


Price: Twenty-eight prints to be sold with all proceeds going to the Museum. Graduated price structure: Edition #3-10 for $2,000 each (SOLD); Edition #11-20 for $2,500 (SOLD); Edition #21-30 for $3,000. $1,500 is tax deductible.


Walter Piehl, Smokey Nellie, Pigmented ink-jet with lithography, 24 x 32 1/4 inches, 2013.
Walter named the work after the two horses his friend Bill Goldston rode as a youngster in Oklahoma.