Current Exhibitions

Arnold Saper: Face to Face

February 8 - April 27, 2014
 

Arnold Saper was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada in 1933. He attended the University of Manitoba and received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1961.  After earning a Certificate in Education, Mr. Saper taught for several years in high schools in rural Manitoba and Winnipeg. In 1963 he received a Pre-Masters grant from the Canada Council to study with the American artist Mauricio Lasansky at the State University of Iowa. He held a Graduate Assistantship with Lasanky for two years and graduated with a Master’s Degree in 1966. Arnold Saper taught printmaking and drawing at the University of Manitoba from 1966 to 1996 and was appointed full professor in 1979. He received a Canada Council Grant for a printing press in 1969. He retired from teaching in 1996.

 


Arnold Saper, Esther, Mug Shot, Charcoal and graphite,
20" H x 30" W
Esther Eggers, an attractive Australian woman, lured men into alleyways so her brother could knock them out and rob them.

 

John Hitchcock

John Hitchcock

Traces of the Plains, 2013, Naugahyde screenprint, wooden structure and video installation, 20' L x 20' W x 5' H

Tim Schouten

Tim Schouten

Left: Robert Lives Here (Spirit Lake), 2012-2013, Mixed media, 48"H x 72" W Right: 2012-2013, Text Paintings, Mixed media, 10 units: 8" H x 10" W Faces (Spirit Lake), Acrylic on panel, 32 units: 8" H x 10" W

Mary Lucier

Mary Lucier

Drum Songs With the Cikana Candeska Drum Group, Spirit Lake, May 23, 2013, shot at the exhibitions opening reception. Video projection and sound.

Rena Effendi

Rena Effendi

April 2013, C-Type print, 40cm x 40cm and 100cm x 100cm

Bill Harbort

Bill Harbort

Passing Through Spirit Lake, 2013, Printed polypoplin backdrop with cut plexiglass and pouring medium, 14' H x 19' W

Terry Jelsing

Terry Jelsing

Conference of Mothers for Sunniva, 2013, Mixed media, 15' H x 16' Dia.

SONGS FOR SPIRIT LAKE

February 8 - April 27, 2014


Laurel Reuter, Director of the North Dakota Museum of Art, Songs for Spirit Lake brings together six artists from various disciplines and backgrounds, including Native Americans, to create work with and about a community that has minimal contact with contemporary artists. It was developed under the aegis of the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation’s Artistic Innovation and Collaboration Grant Program. This first in-progress show opened at the Robert Rauschenberg Project Space in New York (May 2013), followed by a two-week showing at the Cankdeska Cikana Community College at Spirit Lake. The commissioned artists were asked to create work in responds to contemporary life on the mixed-race, multi-cultural, poverty-ridden Spirit Lake Dakota Sioux Reservation. The show includes images of today’s painted and photographed inhabitants of Spirit Lake, sculptural investigations into Tribal family structure, poetic reflections on tough social issues faced by today’s Spirit Lake people, and work based in the mythic roll of the bison in Northern Plains Indian culture. The artists are photographer Rena Effendi of Baku, Azerbaijan who now lives in Cairo; Bill Harbort, a New Yorker transplanted to Minot, North Dakota, who left a lucrative graphic design career to teach art to college students; and John Hitchcock, of Southern Cheyenne and Northern European descent who teaches at the University of Wisconsin. They are joined by North Dakota sculptor Terry Jelsing, Manitoba painter Tim Schouten, and New York video installation artist Mary Lucier who has completed two major works about loss in North Dakota.
 


North Dakota Museum of Art Press Release

Rauschenberg Foundation Press Release

Terry Jelsing, Songs for Spirit Lake
Memorial for Robert Rauschenberg by Mary Lucier
Rena Effendi  2014, Observed Portraits, 2nd prize singles.
Unsteady ground
Vivid landscapes explore natural beauty and complicated histories
 

This project is supported by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation’s Artistic Innovation and Collaboration Program, which supports fearless and innovative collaborations in the spirit of Robert Rauschenberg.
 

 

Barton's Place

November 16 - Ongoing
 

Barton Lidice Benes lived in a magical apartment in New York City. It was filled with over $1 million in African, Egyptian, South American, Chinese and contemporary art, plus much more as touted in the New York Times when it announced Barton’s intended gift to North Dakota (2/6/05).

Barton Benes and his treasure trove spent decades tucked away in a glorious boxcar space in Westbeth, the artist community in New York’s West Village. There, rare works of art joined ranks with the arcane, the wistful, the amusing, the deeply serious, and a “maddening and morbid array of things” (a human toe found on New York’s Williamsburg Bridge, a stuffed mink wearing a mink coat, an eight-foot giraffe head). This temporary installation suggests the drama and mystery embedded in Barton’s private wonderland. Continue reading...

 

N.D. MUSEUM OF ART RECONSTRUCTS NEW YORK ARTIST’S APARTMENT
 
Radiolab Podcast: As It Happens

 


 

 

Walter Piehl / ULAE print benefits NDMOA

 

North Dakota artist Walter Piehl collaborated with Bill Goldston, Director of Universal Limited Art Editions on Long Island, to create a work of art as a benefit for the North Dakota Museum of Art. ULAE is known as a pioneer for its work with artists such as Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and James Rosenquist as they introduced lithography as a fine art form to Americans. Only thirty Walter Piehl prints exist. Print number one will go into the Museum's permanent collection. Print two will be raffled off to the general public, and the remaining twenty-eight are available for Museum supporters, Walter's friends, and collectors. Contact the Museum 701.777.4195 to secure your print, destined to take its rightful place in the history of art on the Northern Plains.


Price: Twenty-eight prints to be sold with all proceeds going to the Museum. Graduated price structure: Edition #3-10 for $2,000 each (SOLD); Edition #11-20 for $2,500 (SOLD); Edition #21-30 for $3,000. $1,500 is tax deductible.


Walter Piehl, Smokey Nellie, Pigmented ink-jet with lithography, 24 x 32 1/4 inches, 2013.
Walter named the work after the two horses his friend Bill Goldston rode as a youngster in Oklahoma.