upcoming exhibitions

CRAIG LANGAGER SCULPTURE
IN THE MUSEUM'S
PERMANENT COLLECTION

May 4 - May 28, 2014

 

Seattle-based sculptor Craig Langager offered the North Dakota Museum of Art a selection from his major sculptures for its collection. Many of these works are based on his memories and experiences of being on the Northern Plains in the 1980s and 1990s. The sculpture also reflects his long concern with environmental issues and endangered species. 

Langager was born in Seattle, Washington in 1946. Being raised in Aberdeen, South Dakota and attending Northern State University and Bemidji State University, ties Langager to the Northern Plains. This bond to the region led Langager to offer selected pieces from this body of work to the Museum’s collection, to insure that the people of the region have access to significant works of art that are regionally important.

 


 

Mary Bonkemeyer: PAINTINGS

June 5 - July 27, 2014

 

Mary Bonkemeyer was born in North Carolina. She attended the University of Iowa, where she received a Masters Degree in Fine Arts, and studied with Philip Guston. She currently lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where she continues her work as a painter.

Bonkemeyer thinks of her paintings “as traces or marks that weave together, quiver, alternate, and slowly the eye registers and reads an unrepeatable pattern. There are no objects, only places—places where some little thing is coming into being”. 

 


 

Fractured: North Dakota’s Oil Boom

August 3 - October 12, 2014

 

Terry Evans and Elizabeth Farnsworth take visitors to the prairies of North Dakota to explore the impact of the current oil boom on the Williston Basin region. Nationally acclaimed photographer Terry Evans and award-winning journalist Elizabeth Farnsworth have been exploring and documenting the upheaval caused by the oil boom, which has implications far beyond North Dakota. The exhibition features their photographs and writings as well as high-resolution scans of prairie specimens from the Chicago Field Museum's own collections.


Photo Credit Terry Evans